Advances in Chemical Physics, Volume 149 by Stuart A. Rice, Aaron R. Dinner

By Stuart A. Rice, Aaron R. Dinner

The Advances in Chemical Physics series?the leading edge of study in chemical physics

The Advances in Chemical Physics sequence offers the chemical physics box with a discussion board for severe, authoritative reviews of advances in each zone of the self-discipline. packed with state of the art examine said in a cohesive demeanour no longer came upon somewhere else within the literature, every one quantity of the Advances in Chemical Physics sequence serves because the ideal complement to any complicated graduate classification dedicated to the examine of chemical physics.

This quantity explores:

  • Quantum Dynamical Resonances in Chemical Reactions: From A + BC to Polyatomic platforms (Kopin Liu)

  • The Multiscale Coarse-Graining process (Lanyuan Lu and Gregory A. Voth)

  • Molecular Solvation Dynamics from Inelastic X-ray Scattering Measurements (R.H. Coridan and G.C.L. Wong)

  • Polymers below Confinement (M. Muthukumar)

  • Computational reviews of the houses of DNA-linked Nanomaterials (One-Sun Lee and George C. Schatz)

  • Nanopores: Single-Molecule Sensors of Nucleic Acid established Complexes (Amit Meller)

Content:

Show description

Read Online or Download Advances in Chemical Physics, Volume 149 PDF

Similar physical & theoretical books

Chemical And Biochemical Physics: New Frontiers

This ebook offers fresh study in Chemical and Biochemical physics. Chemical physics addresses a wide range of difficulties. a good chemical physicist is a "jack-of-all-trades", capable of follow the rules and methods of the sector to every thing from high-tech fabrics to biology. simply because the fields of chemistry and physics have improved, so have chemical physics topic parts, which come with polymers, fabrics, surfaces/interfaces, and organic macromolecules, in addition to the normal small molecule and condensed section structures.

Charge transfer complexes in biological systems

Reading the position performed by way of partial cost move in biology, this paintings deals a theroetical foundation of the physics and chemistry of cost move advanced formation, specially the functionality of excited states. It discusses drug interactions, highlighting interplay among forms of antibiotics and indicates methods for the synthesis of pharmaceutical items with lowered unwanted effects.

Advances in Chemical Physics, Volume 149

The Advances in Chemical Physics sequence? the innovative of study in chemical physics The Advances in Chemical Physics sequence presents the chemical physics box with a discussion board for severe, authoritative reviews of advances in each zone of the self-discipline. packed with state of the art learn pronounced in a cohesive demeanour now not chanced on somewhere else within the literature, each one quantity of the Advances in Chemical Physics sequence serves because the ideal complement to any complex graduate type dedicated to the examine of chemical physics.

Palladium-Catalyzed Coupling Reactions: Practical Aspects and Future Developments

This guide and prepared reference brings jointly all major problems with sensible value for readers in a single unmarried quantity. whereas protecting homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis, the textual content is exclusive in targeting such very important features as utilizing various response media, microwave ideas or catalyst recycling.

Extra resources for Advances in Chemical Physics, Volume 149

Example text

Figure 22 presents the normalized excitation function for Cl + CHD3 (v1 = 1) → HCl + CD3 (v = 0) [93]. In Fig. 22 (a), two typical CD3 (v = 0) product images, IR-on and IR-off, are shown. For brevity, the product pairs are labeled as following. The numbers in the parentheses denote (from left to right) the quanta of vibrational excitation in HCl and the modes in CD3 products, respectively, and the outer subscript indicates the reactant state (“g” for ground state CHD3 , “s” for stretch-excited CHD3 , and “b” for bend-excited CHD3 ).

49. G. C. Schatz, J. M. Bowan, and A. Kuppermann, J. Chem. , 63, 674 (1975). 50. D. M. Neumark, A. M. Wodtke, G. N. Robinson, C. C. Hayden, and Y. T. Lee, J. Chem. , 82, 3045 (1985). 51. D. M. Neumark, A. M. Wodtke, G. N. Robinson, C. C. Hayden, K. Shobatake, R. K. Sparks, T. P. Schafer, and Y. T. Lee, J. Chem. , 82, 3067 (1985). 52. A. Weaver and D. M. Neumark, Faraday Discuss. Chem. , 91, 5 (1991). 53. D. E. Manolopoulos, K. Stark, H. J. Werner, D. W. Arnold, S. E. Bradforth, and D. M. Neumark, Science, 262, 1852 (1993).

D. Levine, Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Cambridge Univ. Press, 2005. 22. M. S. Child, Molecular Collision Theory, Academic Press, 1974. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. D. A. Micha, Acc. Chem. , 6, 138 (1973). D. W. Chandler, J. Chem. , 132, 110901 (2010). D. M. Neumark, Ann. Rev. Phys. , 43, 153 (1992). R. B. Metz, S. E. Bradforth, and D. M. Neumark, Adv. Chem. , LXXXI, 1 (1992). D. M. Neumark, Phys. Chem. Chem. , 7, 433 (2005). P. G. Wenthold, D. A. Hrovat, W. T. Borden, and W. C. Lineberger, Science, 272, 1456 (1996).

Download PDF sample

Rated 4.23 of 5 – based on 27 votes