An Inscription from Mycenae by Marcellus T. Mitsos

By Marcellus T. Mitsos

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1–2; also Le Cycle de La BDSM (2003), pp. 85–9; Alain Chartier (1974), pp. 360–1. Gretchen Angelo explores the woman’s responses in Andreas Capellanus’s De amore, in relation to the uncourtly behaviour of Chartier’s Belle Dame sans mercy in ‘A Most Uncourtly Lady: The Testimony of the Belle Dame sans mercy’, Exemplaria 15/1 (Spring, 2003), 133–57. I am grateful to Gretchen Angelo for sending me this article pre-publication. ⁶⁸ As I discuss in Chapter 3, Chartier’s motives stemmed from a desire not simply to promote the valorization of female discourse but more importantly to free poetic language from the corrupt influences of a courtly or self-serving discourse.

Bloch continues, ‘the rise of an inquisitory court system, in which argumentation was practised in the place of battle, along with the increasingly dialectical patterns of Latin and vernacular poetry, attest to the tremendous importance in all areas of cultural life—legal, intellectual, and literary—of what remains the verbal form of violence par excellence: the debate’, p. 164. ⁴⁰ Bloch does not examine the later Middle Ages in much detail, but concentrates mainly on earlier disputes between troubadours, singling out the joc-partit and the tenso as verbally competitive forms.

Bloch continues, ‘the rise of an inquisitory court system, in which argumentation was practised in the place of battle, along with the increasingly dialectical patterns of Latin and vernacular poetry, attest to the tremendous importance in all areas of cultural life—legal, intellectual, and literary—of what remains the verbal form of violence par excellence: the debate’, p. 164. ⁴⁰ Bloch does not examine the later Middle Ages in much detail, but concentrates mainly on earlier disputes between troubadours, singling out the joc-partit and the tenso as verbally competitive forms.

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